Study Group – Love and Vindictiveness: Works of Karen Horney
Facilitated by Carrie Barron, MD

2 Fridays | June 7 & June 14, 2024

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (Central Time)
via Zoom

3 CEU/CE Credits (1.5 per session)

REGISTER HERE

Full Member: $50
Student/Retired Member: $30
Non-Members: $60
Fanon Fund (Black or indigenous participants): Free
Please contact info@austinpsychoanalytic.org for information on the Fanon Fund.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Karen Horney was a psychoanalyst and a contemporary of Freud who had “a mind of her own”. She developed a relational theory of anxiety and wrote about women’s concerns in forward-thinking ways. Horney considered relational, cultural, and social phenomena in treatment at a time when intra-psychic perspectives were dominant. She covered common concerns like marriage, feeling abused, dread, and work inhibition. Despite her enormous contributions, she has been undervalued. In this study group, we will cover her work on the over-emphasis of love and the value of vindictiveness.

 SYLLABUS
Session 1: June 7, 2024
Reading: An NPR podcast/transcript with Horney from 1950.
Learning Objective: Discuss over-emphasis on love.
Session 2: June 14, 2024
Reading: Horney, K. (1948) The Value of Vindictiveness. American Journal of Psychoanalysis 8:3-12
Learning Objective: Examine the value of vindictiveness.Optional reading for both: Gilman, Charlotte Perkins (1892) The Yellow Wallpaper. The Yellow Wallpaper is a classic short story, written in Horney’s time, that explores love, self-realization, repressed rage, and mental despair.

FACILITATOR

Carrie Barron, MD is an Associate Professor of Medical Education at Dell Medical School and served on the Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research for 18 years. She has published in JAPA, The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, and has a blog on Psychology Today. She has won several academic awards.

 

REFERENCES
https://amjpa.org/aap/about-karen-horney/



Tarzian M, Ndrio M, Fakoya AO. An Introduction and Brief Overview of Psychoanalysis. Cureus. 2023 Sep 13;15(9):e45171. doi:10.7759/cureus.45171.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/beautiful-minds/finding-inner-harmony-the-underappreciated-legacy-of-karen-horney/

Quinn, S. (1987). A mind of her own: the life of Karen Horney. New York, Summit Books.

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION: Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  Austin Psychoanalytic is approved by the Texas State Board of Social Workers Examiners (Provider # 5501) to provide continuing education for social workers and the Texas State Board of Examiners of Marriage and Family Therapists (Provider #1138). We also meet the requirements to provide continuing education for the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors. This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 1.5 continuing education credits. Division 39 is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. Division 39 is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. If participants have special needs, we will attempt to accommodate them. Please address questions, concerns and any complaints to info@austinpsychoanalytic.org. There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest. Participants will be informed of the utility/validity of the content/approach discussed (including the basis for the statements about validity/utility), as well as the limitations of the approach and most common (and severe) risks, if any, associated with the program’s content.